How to Play Craps at an Online Casino

Did you ever wonder how do you play craps at an online casino? This is a basic guide to playing craps online. These are the rules and strategies for playing craps online; you can always look at more advanced strategies once you have mastered the basics. Please feel free to wear a tuxedo and drink a martini while you play so you can feel like you are in a real casino.

Craps history is longer than most of its casino game counterparts. Competing theories of its origins range from craps having roots in the middle Ages to being a Roman invention where Roman Legions made “dice” from pig’s knuckles. Thank goodness for plastic! The simple part about playing craps online is placing the bet, rolling the dice and seeing if your number comes up. The complicated part is the betting field. Looking at all the numbers, symbols and betting “lines” on the table can overwhelm even a seasoned player let alone a novice craps online player.

While you are trying to learn the crap’s rules, playing online you can play for free at reputable online casinos. Because winning at craps online takes practice, practice, practice. While you are learning you can develop winning strategies without breaking your bankroll. Online craps is both simple and complicated at the same time. Choosing the basic betting options before you place a bet will enable you to increase your payoffs. You will learn how to play smart and manage your bankroll. Players hoping to dominate the Craps table should be familiar with the 36 possible results of each roll before placing any cash on the table. Craps online is primarily a game of chance but there are a few secrets when you are placing bets. You should avoid placing bets which increase the house edge.

Craps may look simple, but there is much more to this dice game than meets the eye. Players unfamiliar with betting types, game flow and odds may find it intimidating, if not impossible, to keep up with game action their first time at the craps online table. Playing craps online and in an old fashion casino is both fun and relaxing. But don’t be fooled into thinking that it isn’t also a serious, strategic game. Some argue it is a game of luck I to disagree. What is for certain is that there exist definite rules and betting tactics that demand players establish their own approach if they hope to win at craps online. Where craps was once considered a game for high-rollers, it is now available for all to enjoy thanks to the online casinos and home computers.

Online craps games capture all the thrills and excitement of those you find regular old fashion land-based casinos, but without the need to spend cash on travel. Modern technology allows fans of the game to play from the comfort of home and enjoy fast-paced action with graphics so real you may think you’re actually in Vegas playing craps.

How to Roll a Snake Eyes in Craps

If you stop to think about it, you’ll realize that the only way to roll a 2 (“snake eyes”) is by rolling two 1s; no other combination will do it. Similarly the only way to roll a 12 (“boxcars”) is to roll two 6s; there is no other combination of dice that will arrive at that number. There is also only one way to make 11: by rolling a 6 and a 5. But you can get a 4 by rolling a 3 and a 1 or a 2 and another 2; 5 can be reached with a 4 and a 1 or a 3 and a 2; and there are three ways to make 6: with a 5 and 1 or 4 and 2 or 3 and 3. Similarly there are three ways to make 7, three ways to make 8, but only two ways to make 9 and two ways to make 10. So right away you can see that statistically you are likelier to make some points than others. And speaking of statistics, 7 is the number that comes up the most frequently… though of course it wins for you only if you get it on your come-out roll. After 7, the most common numbers to come up are 5, 6, and 8.

Rolling a 7 or 11 on your come-out roll is an instant win; 2, 3, or 12 is an instant loss. Any other number is the point you have to make again before rolling a 7 (called “sevening out”). If you seven out, you lose. But if you make your point- roll another 5, or 8, or whatever your point is- you win.

You can also play without rolling the dice… by betting against the shooter. (That makes you a “fader.”)

When you first start playing, bet small. Yes, it’s true that if you don’t bet big you can’t win big, but till you learn what you’re doing and get comfortable with the betting and the odds, it’s best to bet small so that, if you blunder, your error will cost you a minimal amount of money.

When you’re a little more familiar with and comfortable with the game, you can bet progressively. How? By increasing your bet just a bit each time you win. Not doubling your bet. If you’re betting $5 the first time and win, bet two times $5, or $10, the next time, and if you win, then go to three times $5, or $15, and then $20 and so on. You are not doubling your bet. You are not betting it all. And when you lose… which assuredly will happen at some point… you will still have some winnings left. After the loss, bet your basic $5 again, and keep stepping up the amount of your bet in the same fashion as before. This method maximizes your wins and minimizes your losses.

But if you stick around and play all evening, there’s a good chance you’ll come out a loser. The smart move is to obey the old axiom and “quit while you’re ahead.” Have you doubled the amount of money you started with? Did you log on to the casino with $100 to play with, and do you now have $200? Then it’s a smart time to quit for the night… or perhaps try your hand at some other game. But “walk away” (click away) from the craps table while you’re a winner.

Craps Odds – What You Should Know About Them and the House Edge – Sorry, the Dice Aren’t Talking

There are many things to consider when you decide to take on the subject – craps odds. The experts tend to agree…well, most of them tend to agree, you must first understand craps odds, in order to be knowledgeably equipped to play the game of craps.

In fact, some will stress that you must know the odds before you make a bet, in order to know which bets give the house (casino) a smaller edge over you.

Why does the house edge matter? One can argue that the game of craps cannot be beaten. When considering craps odds, there is mathematical evidence to back this statement. This being true, doesn’t it make good sense to decrease the advantage of the house, thereby hoping to decrease the amount you will ultimately lose?

There is a chance that you may be thinking – Craps cannot be beaten? Heck, I’ve walked away a winner before, so that’s not true. This argument, when not taking craps odds and the house edge into consideration, can hold water under certain conditions.

However, when considering craps odds, the thinking is not that a particular session or series of rolls cannot be beaten. The idea is that craps odds and the house edge are designed to ensure the house cannot be beaten over a long period of time.

Let’s examine this for a moment.

We can begin to understand craps odds by taking a look at the probability (chance, or odds) of rolling a particular number. The first thing for you to do is calculate the number of combinations possible using a pair of dice.

You can see that there are six sides to one die. Each side represents a specific number. The numbers are – 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6.

There are two dice, so you multiply six times six to determine the number of combinations possible. In this case, the number is 36 (6 x 6 = 36).

Next, treating each die separately (die A on the left, and die B on the right), determine how many ways you can roll each of the following numbers – 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12.

Here are the results – 2 (1 way), 3 (2 ways), 4 (3 ways), 5 (4 ways), 6 (5 ways), 7 (6 ways), 8 (5 ways), 9 (4 ways), 10 (3 ways), 11 (2 ways), 12 (1 way).

Now, you calculate the probability by dividing the number of ways to roll a number by the number of combinations possible using a pair of dice (36). For example, there is one way to roll the number 2, so you have a 1 in 36 chance of rolling a two. The probability is 1/36 or 2.78%.

Here are the probabilities of rolling each number – 2 (1/36, 2.78%), 3 (2/36, 5.56%), 4 (3/36, 8.33%), 5 (4/36, 11.11%), 6 (5/36, 13.89%), 7 (6/36, 16.67%), 8 (5/36, 13.89%), 9 (4/36, 11.11%), 10 (3/36, 8.33%), 11 (2/36, 5.56%), 12 (1/36, 2.78%).

The probabilities above show what is probable or likely to occur on each independent roll of the dice. Independent because whatever the outcome of the next roll of the dice, it is not dependent on, or affected by previous rolls of the dice.

You may have heard the saying – dice have no memory – well, considering the fact that they are objects without the capacity to think or run calculations, in other words, dice do not have a brain – it is safe to say that dice cannot remember anything, so previous rolls are irrelevant.

Using the same argument, you can say that dice do not know the probabilities, so they are not influenced by probabilities. But, if that is true, couldn’t you also say that dice do not know craps odds, so they cannot be influenced by craps odds? Ooops! Don’t answer that just yet.

Now that you know the probabilities, your next step is to understand how this relates to craps odds.

First off, you cannot establish true craps odds without knowing the probability of rolling a specific number. One definition of odds, according to Merriam-Webster’s Online Dictionary, is as follows — the ratio of the probability of one event to that of an alternative event.

In other words, you need to know the probability of rolling a number in a specific situation, in order to determine the true craps odds.

Here is a simple formula for true craps odds on rolling any number before a 7 on the next roll: P7 divided by PN = true craps odds. The letter P stands for probability, and the letter N stands for the number to roll before seven.

Using this formula you can calculate the true craps odds of rolling a 2 before the 7. P7/P2 = true craps odds, so 16.67% (.1667)/2.78% (.0278) = 6.00. The true craps odds of rolling a 2 before the 7 — is 6 to 1.

This same concept, not necessarily the same formula, is used to mathematically determine the true craps odds of all the bets in the game of craps. However, the house edge is calculated to favor the house, and this is what gives the house the advantage.

For example, the true craps odds of rolling a 6 before a 7 is – P7/P6 =.1667/.1389 = 1.2, or 6/5, or 6 to 5, or 6:5. However, the house pays 7:6 (7 to 6) when you make a place bet on the number 6. The difference between the true craps odds of 6:5 and the actual payout of 7:6 is the house edge, which is 1.52%.

With this in mind, what happens if you bet $12 to place the 6 (make a bet that the 6 shows before a 7), and the shooter rolls a 6?

The true craps odds would be a payout of 6:5 or 6 dollars profit for every 5 dollars you bet, which is about $14.40 profit. However, the house pays you 7:6, instead of the true craps odds, so you only get $14 profit…the difference being 40 cents.

Does this mean you lost $.40? Hmmm…You put $12 on the table, won $14 profit, plus you get to keep your $12 bet…would you feel like you lost money at this point?

Do you think the dice know just how much the house edge cost you?

Okay, that’s quite a bit to think about, so let’s dig a little deeper.

You know that the number 6 will be rolled five times in 36 rolls…in theory. You also know that the number 7 will be rolled six times in 36 rolls…in theory.

Let’s alternate the 6 and 7 such that 6 is rolled before 7, then 7 is rolled before 6. Further, let’s do this to reflect the theory that 6 will be rolled five times and 7 will be rolled 6 times. Additionally, we will make a $12 place bet on 6 for each time we alternate the 6 and 7.

By the way, this will represent a total of eleven bets. Five of the bets will be a win for 6, and six of the bets will be a loss due to the 7. This will make more sense as the example progresses.

You start with a $12 place bet on 6 and it wins. This gives you a profit of $14.

Next, you make another $12 place bet on 6, but, since we are alternating results, the 7 is rolled before a 6. You lose the $12 place bet, and now have a total profit of $2 ($14 previous profit minus the $12 loss).

Next, another $12 place bet on 6 and it wins. This gives you a profit of $14 for this bet, and an overall profit of $16 (the previous total profit of $2 plus the $14 profit on this bet).

Next, you make another $12 place bet on 6, but, since we are alternating results, the 7 is rolled again before a 6. You lose the $12 place bet, and now have a total profit of $4 ($16 previous profit minus the $12 loss).

So far you have rolled 6 twice and 7 twice.

Next, another $12 place bet on 6 and it wins. This gives you a profit of $14 for this bet, and an overall profit of $18 (the previous total profit of $4 plus the $14 profit on this bet).

Next, you make another $12 place bet on 6, but the 7 is rolled again before a 6. You lose the $12 place bet, and now have a total profit of $6 ($18 previous profit minus the $12 loss).

Next, another $12 place bet on 6 and it wins. This gives you a profit of $14 for this bet, and an overall profit of $20 (the previous total profit of $6 plus the $14 profit on this bet).

Next, you make another $12 place bet on 6, but the 7 is rolled again before a 6. You lose the $12 place bet, and now have a total profit of $8 ($20 previous profit minus the $12 loss).

You have rolled 6 a total of four times and 7 a total of four times. This means you have one more roll of 6 and two more rolls of 7 to go.

Next, another $12 place bet on 6 and it wins. This gives you a profit of $14 for this bet, and an overall profit of $22 (the previous total profit of $8 plus the $14 profit on this bet).

Next, you make another $12 place bet on 6, but the 7 is rolled again before a 6. You lose the $12 place bet, and now have a total profit of $10 ($22 previous profit minus the $12 loss).

Since you have exhausted the rolls of 6 in our hypothetical scenario, you still have one more roll of 7 to go. This means making one more place bet on 6.

You make your final $12 place bet on 6, but the 7 is rolled again before a 6. You lose the $12 place bet, and now have a total profit of -$2 ($10 previous profit minus the $12 loss).

Based on the information above, if your bankroll was only the $12 you began with, you just lost 17% of your bankroll. If your bankroll was $100, you just lost 2% of your bankroll.

Here is the real question — Was the loss due to the probability of rolling 6 before 7, or due to the house edge?

By checking out the same scenario, using the true craps odds, we can get a better idea of the impact of the house edge.

You start with a $12 place bet on 6 and it wins. This gives you a profit of $14.40.

Next, you make another $12 place bet on 6, but, since we are alternating results, the 7 is rolled before a 6. You lose the $12 place bet, and now have a total profit of $2.40 ($14.40 previous profit minus the $12 loss).

Next, another $12 place bet on 6 and it wins. This gives you a profit of $14.40 for this bet, and an overall profit of $16.80 (the previous total profit of $2.40 plus the $14.40 profit on this bet).

Next, you make another $12 place bet on 6, but, since we are alternating results, the 7 is rolled again before a 6. You lose the $12 place bet, and now have a total profit of $4.80 ($16.80 previous profit minus the $12 loss).

So far you have rolled 6 twice and 7 twice.

Next, another $12 place bet on 6 and it wins. This gives you a profit of $14.40 for this bet, and an overall profit of $19.20 (the previous total profit of $4.80 plus the $14.40 profit on this bet).

Next, you make another $12 place bet on 6, but the 7 is rolled again before a 6. You lose the $12 place bet, and now have a total profit of $7.20 ($19.20 previous profit minus the $12 loss).

Next, another $12 place bet on 6 and it wins. This gives you a profit of $14.40 for this bet, and an overall profit of $21.60 (the previous total profit of $7.20 plus the $14.40 profit on this bet).

Next, you make another $12 place bet on 6, but the 7 is rolled again before a 6. You lose the $12 place bet, and now have a total profit of $9.60 ($21.60 previous profit minus the $12 loss).

You have rolled 6 a total of four times and 7 a total of four times. This means you have one more roll of 6 and two more rolls of 7 to go.

Next, another $12 place bet on 6 and it wins. This gives you a profit of $14.40 for this bet, and an overall profit of $24 (the previous total profit of $9.60 plus the $14.40 profit on this bet).

Next, you make another $12 place bet on 6, but the 7 is rolled again before a 6. You lose the $12 place bet, and now have a total profit of $12 ($24 previous profit minus the $12 loss).

Since you have exhausted the rolls of 6 in our hypothetical scenario, you still have one more roll of 7 to go. This means making one more place bet on 6.

You make your final $12 place bet on 6, but the 7 is rolled again before a 6. You lose the $12 place bet, and now have a total profit of $0 ($12 previous profit minus the $12 loss).

Based on the information above, if your bankroll was only the $12 you began with, you just broke even. If your bankroll was $100, you just broke even.

By examining the two hypothetical scenarios above, it should be plain to see that the house edge is not solely responsible for your losses.

The probability of making a number before 7, and the house edge combined, led to the loss. What would have happened if we disregarded the probabilities, and rolled 6 and 7 five times each?

Looking at the first scenario, with the house edge factored in, you would be ahead, with a profit of $10. Looking at the second scenario, with the true craps odds factored in, you would be ahead, with a profit of $12.

What does this mean? Craps odds are not solely responsible for the long term loss expected in the game of craps.

It takes a combination of the probabilities (the number combinations that will be produced over the long run), plus the odds (actual payouts that factor in the house edge), and in certain cases, the rules of the game (for example, the rule that bars 12 on the come out roll when betting Don’t Pass).

Does this mean that you can make a profit in the short run? Yes! How do you determine what the long run is?

Great question! Maybe you should ask the dice.;-)

Dominic LoRiggo – The Man Who Mastered the Secrets of Winning at the Craps Table

In the world of gambling craps has always been associated with a purely luck game that depended on a player getting hot or getting on a streak. You see it all the time in the movies and TV shows where a player starts playing craps and gets on a winning streak so big that he would end up playing at the table all day and his friends come back the next day to see that not only has he lost all his original money but has lost all of the money that he has borrowed to keep playing on top of that. It can be a fun game but it could drain your pocket book really quick. Has anyone ever cracked the system to consistently win at the crap table? So far only a few and we will take a look at the incredible feat of one infamous individual.

Dominic LoRiggio was a man who consistently made more money then the casinos that he has played at on its crap table and has earned some great praise by being called the man with the golden arm. Dominic through many years of practice has perfected the technique of getting the rolls that he needs and in his books explain the physics behind dice control and how to get the rolls you want almost every time. He says to get this style done you need to purchase a regulation craps table. He explains in his books and in his dice control seminars that there is a precise mathematical system involved and it takes discipline and focus as well as practice to be able to do this every time. He gets the cream of the crop as far as clients who sign up for his seminars like famous actors and big businessmen. These well known personalities know his reputation as a dice control specialist and if they are able to pass his courses they believe that they can also succeed at the tables. His courses aren’t cheap but in this world you get what you pay for.

He was originally part of a dice control team called Rosebud and were pretty successful at the beginning but Dominic eventually left them because their bets were too low for his taste as he was a very high roller who liked to bet big to win big. He figured that if he could consistently beat the house why not accumulate a large pot in a shorter period of time. I guess that would give him more time to enjoy his life outside the crap tables. The guy is a legend and people come from all over the globe to try to learn his golden secrets of rolling the dice. To call his feat an amazing one is the understatement of the century.