Using Hedge to Get Ahead in Craps

Of all the games you can play in the casino craps is perhaps the most physically challenging. True, it doesn’t take an Olympic bench presser to roll the dice onto the table. View this from a mental aspect. Your brain is operating at a million miles per second and you’re using every thinkable trick in the book to come out on top. This is all tremendous pressure for some. It may not hit you immediately but later on your body will reap the effects. Winning at craps takes planning and great technique. Online craps doesn’t exactly measure up to the intensity of the casino version but can be rather challenging as well. If there’s a chance of handicapping the dealer, why not do it? The hedge system was created just for that and is an easy way to get ahead of the game.

TRUTH OF HEDGE

Rumor goes that the (Parity) hedge system was created by a team of Las Vegas geniuses. When they weren’t on the job advancing technology, they were at the casino testing other strategies. Combining mathematics into the game of craps, this group developed a system to slowly but surely move ahead of Las Vegas dealers. They performed in stealth mode in order stay under casino radars. While the hedge procedure eventually slipped into the hands of other gamblers, it is said that this innovative team was never found out and their identities remain a mystery to this day.

Using a hedge bet is rather common in online craps games. This process is done by breaking a single bet down into two separate gambles. The reason for this is to increase winning odds and keep a player in the game for a longer amount of time. That extra bet has the ability to cancel out the original. While the amounts aren’t normally much money, it is profit and could get you on a hot streak.

HEDGE EXAMPLES

Depending on the website, you typically win money or credit for both your individual bet and the hedge. For instance, if your don’t pass wage is for $20 on a point of six or eight, you can make an additional bet on that same number at $18. If a seven happens to roll, your winnings total $20 even though you lost $18 in the process. Still you earned a profit of $2, small but positive just the same. Via the online crap table you’re usually rewarded your $20 for the original bet plus the additional $20 on the hedge. Similar scenario: say the point is at four or ten. You have the option to bet on either number for $15. Seven rolls across the table; win twenty and lose fifteen, a five dollar plus. If you’re lucky enough to make point, you lose twenty but move $7 ahead of that with your hedge bet.

Many play online craps strictly for recreational purposes. When no physical money is on the line, you’re open to a variety of options and techniques. You’re not liable to break the dealer by placing hedge bets but slowly stacking chips is very possible. Many people are using the system effectively. Why not give this method a try and see if it works for you?

Craps Proposition Bets: Here Are Eight Wagers to Avoid When Playing This Table Game

Look at any craps table and you’ll see numerous wagers where some appear to have hefty payouts. These are One Roll wagers. None of them pay off in true odds. These bets should be avoided because they can deplete your bankroll very quickly.

Seasoned players know there are thirty-six possible combinations that can be made with a pair of dice, each with numbers one through six. For example, the number 7 can be rolled six ways, such as: 6 and 1; 1 and 6; 5 and 2; 2 and 5; 4 and 3; 3 and 4. The numbers 6 and 8, five ways; numbers 5 and 9, four ways; numbers 4 and 10, three ways; 3 and 11, two ways; and the 2 and 12, one way.

With the aforementioned in mind, here are the bets that you should avoid and why, when playing:

The Field

This is a one roll wager where the player wins if a 2, 3, 4, 9, 10, 11 or 12 appear and loses if a 5, 6, 7 or 8 appear. Payouts are even money except for the 2 or 12 which pay 2/1. A novice player would look at the field and think, “There are seven numbers to win with and only four to lose.” However, if you combine all the ways the winning numbers can be rolled they will total 16. The losing numbers combinations total 20. Thus, winning numbers can appear 45% of the time but the losers come forth at 55%. The house edge is about 6%.

Any Craps

Another one roll wager that pays 7/1 if a two, three, or twelve is rolled. Add them all up and the true odds are 9/1 against. The house edge is about 11%.

Any Seven

The worst one roll wager for the player. The odds are 6/1 against and the payout is only 4/1. If you really want to make this bet, my advice to you is, don’t. The house edge is about 17%.

Hardway Bets

These are the even number totals of 4, 6, 8, and 10. In our Monopoly days we knew them as doubles. Two 2’s = 4, etc. In the world of craps these are known as Hardways. When a player elects to make a Hardway wager he or she is betting that particular number will only appear as an even number total, for example, a hard eight as 4 and 4. All of the other four combinations that make up the eight now become losers. The Hardway bettors now lose when a seven or any eight other than the 4 and 4 appear. The odds are 10/1 against but the payout is only 9/1. The house edge for a hard 4 or 10 is about 11%, and hard 6 or 8, about 9%.

Horn Bet

A one roll wager betting that a 2, 3, 11, or 12 will emerge. The bet must be made in multiples of four units. You will be paid 30/1 for the 2 or 12, or 15/1 for the 3 or 11, minus your three losing wagers. These numbers only have a 1/6 chance of showing up. You can also bet these numbers individually. Your best bet is no bet. The house edge is about 12.5%.

C & E (Craps and Eleven)

The C&E bet is actually a combination of the any craps (2,3,12) bet, or the 11 (AKA Yo) bet. Basically, when you bet on C and E, you are wagering that the shooter will roll any craps numbers (2, 3, or 12) or 11. If you hit any one of these numbers, you win the bet.

There’s a 1 in 6 chance that the C and E bet will hit. The payouts are different for each part of the bet. If the crap numbers come up it pays 3/1. If an 11 is rolled, 7/1. the total overall house edge is 11%.

Fire Bet

Not all casinos offer this wager. The bettor(s) win if the shooter makes at least four different point numbers before a seven out is rolled. Only different point numbers count. The pay tables range from a 10/1 payout for one point made four times up to 2000/1 If all six point numbers are made four times each before a seven out. In this unlikely event the house edge is a whopping 25%!

Hop Bet

This is a one roll verbal bet that is rarely played because most bettors are unaware of it. A player may wager that the dice will hop to a certain combination on the next roll. For example: if you have a hunch that an 8 will be rolled as a 6 and 2, simply shout to the dealer, “Five dollars on hop eight as six and two”. If it happens you will be paid 15/1. You may also call out a Hardway, “Hop eight at four and four”. If you’re lucky, you win 30/1. Any callout is permitted. All payouts are the same. This is a typical sucker bet. Depending on the hop combo called out, the house edge can range from about 5% to 12%.

Your best bet is to stick to the line wagers, pass, don’t pass, come, don’t come with the odds bet(s) and the place numbers 6 and 8.

Good Luck!

Avoid the 7 Biggest Mistakes New Craps Players Make

Many new craps players fail to realize that winning is a process. Set forth below are the 7 biggest mistakes made by new craps players.

The first mistake a new craps player makes is to fail to set a goal of how they want to win. Most people who go to Vegas (and the craps table) have the attitude that they will take with so much money and when they lose, they will stop. This is a defeatist attitude. The attitude we have is that we will win so much money and then we will stop. Depending on the size of our bankroll, we will usually set a goal to win $200 per hour. This is discussed by John Patrick in his book Advanced Craps.

The second mistake made by a new craps player is failing to understand the game, i.e., the probabilities for each number being made. Just because you may know how to place a bet, it does not mean you know how to win. Often a new player will start by winning and think it is a simple game. They increase their bet size only to have the table turn cold and lose it all. New craps players must be aware that the game of craps is based on streaks. Sam Graftstein discusses this in detail in his book The Dice Doctor Revised and Expanded.

The third mistake is not having an adequate bankroll. Craps is a game based on streaks. As such, you cannot and will not win on every bet – – you will have loses. Too often a player does not have an adequate bankroll for the size bets he is making or sets an unrealistic goal of how much to win. If you have a $500 bankroll, it is difficult to set a goal to win $1,000. It does happen, but only when people are lucky. When loses do occur, he may not have enough money to make bets and miss out on a hot shooter. Author Frank Scoblette discusses this in his book Beat the Craps out of the Casinos.

The fourth mistake is drinking while playing. If you are going to play craps, then you can either play to have fun or play to win. It is difficult to do both. New craps players sometimes get intrigued with the free booze and drink too much to concentrate on what they are doing. I have friends who travel to Vegas with grandiose ideas of winning big. I have heard them discuss that one or several of them were doing well until they started drinking. If you are going to drink and party – – wait until after you have left the craps table, not during.

The fifth mistake made by many new players is lacking discipline. Many new players will press their bets when they are winning. While this may work some of the time, too often the new player will have a lot of money on the table when the dreaded 7 appears. You need to take some of your winnings off the table. Sam Graftstein discusses this in detail in his book The Dice Doctor Revised and Expanded.

I was dealing craps for an entertainment company at a private residence for a person’s surprise birthday party. One of the players was setting the dice. Apparently he took lessons on how to be a precision shooter from Beau Parker, a/k/a Dice Coach. At first he was having long rolls and doing extremely well (Beau is an excellent teacher on how to set and influence the dice). This person, however, kept pressing his bets. He rarely took his winnings down. I asked him why he left his winnings on the table because I know personally that Dice Coach does not follow that betting strategy. His explanation was that he kept his bets up until he had a feeling. Within a short time he lost his entire “bankroll.” Good thing he was playing with pretend money instead of real money. Had he had any semblance of a betting strategy he would have done quite well.

The sixth mistake made by new players is not paying attention. New players tend to forget the bets they make, where the dealer placed their bets and also to pick up their winnings. If you forget to pick up your winnings it is considered a bet. The casinos’ policy is “if it lays, it plays.” At a crowded table, the game of craps moves quickly.

The seventh mistake made by new craps players is to believe that a craps system will work. While all systems work some of the time, none work all of the time. So be careful at the tables. You never know if the system will work for hours, days or even longer.

By: David Udjat, Walk Away Craps

Play Craps With Winning Strategies: Placing Across the Board With COME Bets

In my last article on how to play craps, I tackled the rules of the Pass Line and the Don’t Pass Bar. For this article, I will show you how to play craps with the tool of understanding probability. Below, I have created a dice diagram to visually explain the probability of each number rolling in a typical craps game.

Possible 2 = 1 + 1

Possible 3’s = 1 + 2 and 2 + 1

Possible 4’s = 1 + 3 and 3 + 1 and 2 + 2

Possible 5’s = 1 + 4 and 4 + 1 and 2 + 3 and 3 + 2

Possible 6’s = 1 + 5 and 5 + 1 and 2 + 4 and 4 + 2 and 3 + 3

Possible 7’s = 1 + 6 and 6 + 1 and 2 + 5 and 5 + 2 and 3 + 4 and 4 + 3

Possible 8’s = 2 + 6 and 6 + 2 and 3 + 5 and 5 + 3 and 4 + 4

Possible 9’s = 3 + 6 and 6 + 3 and 4 + 5 and 5 + 4

Possible 10’s = 4 + 6 and 6 + 4 and 5 + 5

Possible 11’s = 5 + 6 and 6 + 5

Possible 12 = 6 + 6

NOTICE: There are 36 possible dice combinations. The 7 is the most commonly rolled number with 6 possible combinations resulting in a statistical probability of 1 in 6 rolls.

Below this is a payout diagram for odds through place betting:

4 & 10: Pay $9 for every $5 bet

5 & 9: Pay $7 for every $5 bet

6 & 8: Pay $7 for every $6 bet

Below this is a payout diagram for odds through COME betting:

4 & 10: Pay 2:1 ($2 for every $1 bet) + EVEN MONEY for initial bet

5 & 9: Pay 3:2 ($3 for every $2 bet) + EVEN MONEY for initial bet

6 & 8: Pay 6:5 ($6 for every $5 bet) + EVEN MONEY for initial bet

The main numbers that I will use in describing how to play craps through three distinct winning strategies are numbers 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, and 10. These are called point numbers. Any other number is not a point number. For the following strategy of how to play craps wait until the game is beginning. Look for the puck to say OFF to begin.

Placing/COME Betting – Minimum of $300 bankroll for $5 table

To play craps using this strategy you will NOT make a Pass Line or Don’t Pass wager. As a result, you cannot shoot the dice. Thus you can only play craps using this strategy if there are other players at the table besides yourself.

Scenario

Let’s suppose the shooter rolls a point of 6. Now, place all numbers, including the point, for the minimum amount. This will cost a total of $32 ($5 for numbers 4, 5, 9, and 10 and $6 for numbers 6 and 8). After you place all the numbers, and before the next roll, make another bet by placing a $5 chip in the COME box. Suppose on the second roll, the shooter rolls an 8. First you would get paid $7 for your place bet on the 8. Your COME bet would then go to the 8 and you could take odds on this bet. Toss three $5 chips and make an odds bet on your COME bet through the 8.

NOTE: When COME bets go to the 6 or 8 take 3x (triple) odds. For the 5 or 9 take 2x (double) odds. For the 4 or 10 take 1x (single) odds.

When your COME bet goes to the 8, tell the dealer to take your placed 8 bet down because you do not want to cover the same number through two different wagers. Then, make another bet in the COME box. Let’s say the shooter rolls a 9. You would get paid $7 for your $5 place bet on the 9 and your COME bet would move to the 9. Now that you have two COME bets active, ask the dealer to take ALL place bets down. Make sure to toss two $5 chips for your odds on the 9.

Currently, you have the 8 and the 9 through the COME and you have won $14 through your place bets. So far you are up $14 and you are risking $35. In a worst case scenario, a 7 rolls next, you will have only lost $21. However, if you notice the dice chart, a 7 can roll six different ways. Since there are 36 possible dice combinations, a 7 will statistically roll once every six rolls. In this scenario you were able to play craps through place betting and COME betting, setting up your bets in only three rolls. Therefore, using this strategy to play craps, you would have at least two more rolls to make even more money back and, ultimately, a profit.

Let’s suppose the shooter rolls an 8 next. You would then get paid $5 for your initial COME bet and $18 for your odds bet. If you are confused please look at the table above for a visual aide. The dealer would then give you back your investment and your winnings on the 8. Therefore, it only takes one COME bet to hit in order to make all your money back. At this point, you have a profit of $2 if a 7 rolls next. However, the next roll would be the fifth roll and a 7 is not due, according to probability, until the sixth roll. This means you still have a decent chance to win on your 9 COME bet, resulting in a total profit of $22 on two COME bets.

If you want to play craps more conservatively for this system, simply take 1x (single odds) on all COME bets instead of the typical (1x, 2x, 3x). This way, you can risk less, but still have great potential to make a profit. On my next article on how to play craps I will explain the strategy of “placing the inside.”